Paper 2 Project Calendar

Homework due: Feb. 19 | Feb. 21 | Feb. 24 | Feb. 26 | Feb. 28 | Mar. 2 | Mar. 4 | Mar. 6 | Mar. 9 | Mar. 11 | Mar. 13 | Mar. 23.

M. Mar. 23

Classwork

Zoom Check In | Synchronous or Asynchronous | Zoom Office Hours | Peer Review Parter Assignments

F. Mar. 13

Classwork

Draft due | Marking coming-to-terms, forwarding and countering in your draft.

W. Mar. 11

Classwork

Remote Learning Planning | Paper 1 Feedback

Homework due F. Mar. 13

Complete a full draft of your paper meeting all requirements laid out in the Paper 2 Prompt. Post it to ePortfolio and Google Docs. Share it with me.

M. Mar. 9

Classwork

Homework due W. Mar. 11

If you don’t have prewriting to draw on, write 500-750 new words towards your paper. Focus your efforts on specific moves: map the conversation, come-to-terms with important sources, forward and counter specific critics, lead your reader to your two-part complaint+pitch style thesis.

If you have prewriting to draw from, feel free to use that, but please a) write some new stuff (at least 300 words) and b) rework paragraphs with prewriting in it to improve them. To rework them, you could:

  • add more detail,
  • improve topic sentences by using keywords from your thesis to connect them back,
  • improve the context introducing quotes by rewriting it using the coming-to-terms moves,
  • improve commentary following quotes or paraphrases by rewriting them as forwarding or countering moves,
  • make improvements in signal phrases/verbs, voice markers, and pivot words.

F. Mar. 6

Classwork

Countering

Homework due M. Mar. 9

Activity 1

Look through your readings until you find one or more of your authors who makes one or more of the countering moves. Make an annotation in the margins where you indicate which forwarding move the passage is making. Take photos of at least 3 locations where one of your authors makes a countering move and post it on your ePortfolio.

Activity 2

Find one claim by one writer who you agree with. Write a chunky paragraph in which you first come to terms with his or her article as a whole, then move your reader’s focus to the smaller claim you picked out. In your framing of the writer’s claim, be sure to indicate who s/he is replying to and for what purpose. Explain the writer’s claim in such a way that your reader can understand it without reference to the original. Then make one of the countering moves (taking another side, uncovering values, dissenting) to integrate the original writer’s ideas with your own. Finish your paragraph by saying why what you wrote matters.

Activity 3

Complete any homework assignments from this week that you missed and post them on your ePortfolio.

W. Mar. 4

Classwork

Forwarding

Use this detailed advice about forwarding to help you write these paragraphs and assess how well you’ve done the moves.

Homework due F. Mar. 6

Activity 1

Look through your readings until you find one or more of your authors who makes one or more of the forwarding moves. Make an annotation in the margins where you indicate which forwarding move the passage is making. Take photos of at least 3 locations where one of your authors makes a forwarding move and post it on your ePortfolio.

Use this detailed advice about forwarding to help you write these paragraphs and assess how well you’ve done the moves.

Activity 2

  1. Find one claim by one writer who you agree with. Write a chunky paragraph in which you first come to terms with his or her article as a whole, then move your reader’s focus to the smaller claim you picked out. In your framing of the writer’s claim, be sure to indicate who s/he is replying to and for what purpose. Explain the writer’s claim in such a way that your reader can understand it without reference to the original. Then make one of the forwarding moves (illustrating, authorizing, borrowing, extending) to integrate the original writer’s ideas with your own. Finish your paragraph by saying why what you wrote matters.
  2. Find another claim by a different writer who you agree with. Write a chunky paragraph in which you first come to terms with his or her article as a whole, then move your reader’s focus to the smaller claim you picked out. In your framing of the writer’s claim, be sure to indicate who s/he is replying to and for what purpose. Explain the writer’s claim in such a way that your reader can understand it without reference to the original. Then make one of the forwarding moves (illustrating, authorizing, borrowing, extending) to integrate the original writer’s ideas with your own. Finish your paragraph by saying why what you wrote matters.

M. Mar. 2

Classwork

Individual feedback | Not-Quiz on Coming-to-Terms

Homework due W. Mar. 4 – repeated assignment due to low submission rate.

Use what you learned by studying how other writers make the coming to terms move and from our discussion of the Not-Quiz to help you make it in your own writing.

  1. Find one claim by one writer who you agree with. Write a chunky paragraph in which you come to terms (make all three moves) with his or her article as a whole. Explain the other writer’s ideas in such a way that your reader can understand it without reference to the original article. As you define the writer’s project and notice the keywords and key passages, be sure to indicate who s/he is replying to and for what purpose. Be sure to asses both the uses and limits of the writer’s approach to the debate.
    • Define the writer’s project means describe, explain, give examples of, and translate the other writer’s project into your own words.
    • Notice the keywords and key passages means introducing, contextualizing (who says what to whom…), defining, explaining, giving examples of, translating, and assessing the uses and limits of.
    • A writers ideas or approaches are useful when they help you understand something you didn’t understand before, make connections you otherwise couldn’t, reveal some aspect of the thing you’re working on that couldn’t otherwise be seen, get work done that you need to complete.
    • A writers ideas or approaches are limited when they can only be applied in certain situations, mislead readers, fail to explain important parts of the thing you’re trying to understand, emerge from a biased or interested perspective, obscures or distorts aspects of the thing you’re trying to understand.
  2. Find one claim by one writer who you disagree with. Write a chunky paragraph in which you come to terms (make all three moves) with his or her article as a whole. Explain the other writer’s ideas in such a way that your reader can understand it without reference to the original article. As you define the writer’s project and notice the keywords and key passages, be sure to indicate who s/he is replying to and for what purpose. Be sure to asses both the uses and limits of the writer’s approach to the debate.
    • Use the definitions of define, notice, useful, and limited from item 1 in this list to influence your paragraph.
  3. Post your paragraphs on your ePortfolio with categories ENG 123 and Homework.

F. Feb. 28

Classwork

Notice who is saying what to whom for what purpose in what context.

Homework due M. Mar. 3 – revised

Use what you learned by studying how other writers make the coming to terms move to help you make it in your own writing.

  1. Find one claim by one writer who you agree with. Write a chunky paragraph in which you come to terms (make all three moves) with his or her article as a whole. Explain the other writer’s ideas in such a way that your reader can understand it without reference to the original article. As you define the writer’s project and notice the keywords and key passages, be sure to indicate who s/he is replying to and for what purpose. Be sure to asses both the uses and limits of the writer’s approach to the debate.
    • Define the writer’s project means describe, explain, give examples of, and translate the other writer’s project into your own words.
    • Notice the keywords and key passages means introducing, contextualizing (who says what to whom…), defining, explaining, giving examples of, translating, and assessing the uses and limits of.
    • A writers ideas or approaches are useful when they help you understand something you didn’t understand before, make connections you otherwise couldn’t, reveal some aspect of the thing you’re working on that couldn’t otherwise be seen, get work done that you need to complete.
    • A writers ideas or approaches are limited when they can only be applied in certain situations, mislead readers, fail to explain important parts of the thing you’re trying to understand, emerge from a biased or interested perspective, obscures or distorts aspects of the thing you’re trying to understand.
  2. Find one claim by one writer who you disagree with. Write a chunky paragraph in which you come to terms (make all three moves) with his or her article as a whole. Explain the other writer’s ideas in such a way that your reader can understand it without reference to the original article. As you define the writer’s project and notice the keywords and key passages, be sure to indicate who s/he is replying to and for what purpose. Be sure to asses both the uses and limits of the writer’s approach to the debate.
    • Use the definitions of define, notice, useful, and limited from item 1 in this list to influence your paragraph.
  3. Post your paragraphs on your ePortfolio with categories ENG 123 and Homework.

W. Feb. 26

Classwork & Homework due F. Feb. 28.

  • Write a chunky paragraph identifying all of the key issues or questions in the debate.
  • For at least two of the issues or questions, write a chunky paragraph describing and explaining (using examples) the full range of views on the matter. Choose questions or issues that at least two writers address in their essays.
    • In these two paragraphs, be sure to quote and paraphrase other writers’ positions, use good signal phrases (with good signal verbs), pivot words, and voice markers (to indicate your view of others’ positions).
  • Post these three paragraphs on your ePortfolio using the tags ENG 123 and Homework.

M. Feb. 24

Share your map. Mapping a debate workshop

Homework due W. Feb. 26.

  • Map the views of all authors on at least two of the most important issues or questions of your debate.

F. Feb. 21

Richards’s concepts & criteria | Mapping a debate

Homework due M. Feb. 23.

Pick one of the debates to participate in and create a map of the debate by identifying the questions or issues in it and the diverse points of view, concepts, and answers different writers have.

W. Feb. 19

Listen to music. Why does music matter? What could we talk and think about?

Homework due F. Feb. 21. Categorize each of these posts as ENG 123 and Homework.

  1. Print Chris Richards’s “The Five Hardest Questions in Pop Music,” number the paragraphs, and identify and mark each of the five questions.
  2. As you read, look for and mark passages in Richards’s essay where he elaborates on the questions he asks and for passages where he develops conceptual vocabulary to construct answers to his questions.
    • In his “Is Cultural Appropriation Every Okay?” segment, the conceptual vocabulary includes words like: theft v. influence, taking v. making, imbalance of power, travelers v. tourists.
  3. Choose two of the five questions you think you might be interested in exploring. For each of the two questions, write a chunky paragraph posing the question and explaining it to a person who hasn’t thought about it before. Give examples from your own knowledge of music. Then write another paragraph giving your own position on the question and explaining why you think figuring out an answer to your questions matters.

M. Feb. 17

Signal phrases, Parenthetical citation (using paragraph numbers), Works Cited, MLA-Style Name Block, Last Name and Page Number.

Homework due W. Feb. 19. Categorize each of these posts as ENG 123 and Homework.

  1. Create a blog post on your ePortfolio. Write 500 words about the role of music in your life. Consider a few of these questions to get you started:
    • Which musicians, bands, or songs do you listen to regularly?
    • Which musicians, bands, or songs mean the most to you? Why do they matter to you?
    • Which songs/lyrics inspire you?
    • Which musicians, bands, or songs do you have negative feelings about? Why?
    • Are there any musicians, bands, or songs you absolutely won’t listen to? Why?
    • What don’t older people understand about the music you like?
  2. Using Spotify or YouTube, make a playlist of at least 5 songs that you think I should listen to. Write a 150-200 word introduction to the playlist. Post a link to your playlist and your introduction onto a new blog post on your ePortfolio.

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